REAL AUSTRALIA

Voice of Real Australia: Everyday heroes abound as flood crisis continues

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Top left: Jake Elven performs a rescue on a jet ski. Middle left: Photo: Port Macquarie SES. Bottom left: Ben and Tom Moreton on kayaks. Main: Residents Vick and Mitch at Telegraph Point club. Photo: Kellie Morley.

Top left: Jake Elven performs a rescue on a jet ski. Middle left: Photo: Port Macquarie SES. Bottom left: Ben and Tom Moreton on kayaks. Main: Residents Vick and Mitch at Telegraph Point club. Photo: Kellie Morley.

To say the part of the world I live in is a little wet at the moment would be an understatement.

Like much of NSW's east coast, in Sydney's Hawkesbury district it's bucketing down, the rivers are flooded and homes and livelihoods have been lost under metres of water.

I'm safe high on a hill, but there's a landslide up the road and bridge underwater down the bottom, which has left our community more isolated than we might have anticipated.

But we've still got access to shops (even if they can't restock) and while there's no hospital on our new island, support isn't far away as this 37-year-old found out when she went into labour yesterday.

All in all, though, we are the lucky ones.

Down the hill, the waters are rising and people are losing everything. But it hasn't stopped the community spirit.

Oakville resident Jake Elven is proof, putting his own life at risk to save a couple stranded at Pitt Town Bottoms, in Sydney's north west.

For those in need, there is free boarding for stranded cats and dogs on offer, while others are getting out the shovels and filling sandbags.

On the NSW North Coast, it's a similar story.

Oyster farmer David Tunstead saved 24-year-old Mikaela Priest who was sitting on top of her caravan, about 20 minutes away from being pulled into the floodwaters around her.

More than a quarter of a million dollars has been raised in just 48 hours to support the recovery efforts, airline Rex has even pitched in with a $500,000 budget for the council to use to purchase flights to benefit local affected residents, and then there's this moment.

As Port Macquarie News editor Tracey Fairhurst wrote, this photo (pictured above) of flood-affected residents waist-deep in floodwater coming together at the now decimated Telegraph Point recreation club captures the spirit of the small village community.

Stay strong and stay safe everybody.

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