Camden and Wollondilly named highest toll paying regions in Sydney

New toll on old road: Travelling towards the city, the M8 enters the tunnel from the middle lanes while the M5 lanes bypass them on either side. Picture: WestConnex
New toll on old road: Travelling towards the city, the M8 enters the tunnel from the middle lanes while the M5 lanes bypass them on either side. Picture: WestConnex

Camden and Wollondilly residents are forking out the most money for tolls according to new data released this week.

The data covering the period from May to September 2020, compiled by illion and AlphaBeta (part of Accenture), scanned the transactions of millions of commuters to calculate average spending on tolls per household each week.

It found that some toll road users in south-west Sydney were forking out more than double in tolls than people living in inner city areas.

AlphaBeta director Dr Andrew Charlton said the data demonstrated the effect of toll roads on south-western Sydney households.

"The high toll-paying suburbs from Campbelltown in the south to The Hills in the north is Sydney's new 'latte line' - a division in Sydney that speaks to the growing inequities in our city," he said.

"This data shows the slow creep of toll roads in Sydney; nibble by nibble they have turned into a financial shark bite for commuters in some parts of the city.

"Because many of the higher paid jobs are in the city, people in the west face a tax on getting those jobs. Some of them will be wondering if it's worth it."

The new data also demonstrates which western Sydney regions are paying the most in tolls compared to their metro counterparts.

In Wollondilly, the average household pays $14.89 per week in tolls, which is more more than double (112 per cent more) than inner metro households.

For the top 10 per cent of shire households paying tolls, this equates to $5274 per year.

Camden toll-paying households are forking out $15.26 per week, which means the average household pays more than double (117 per cent more) in tolls than inner metro residents.

For the top 10 per cent of Camden households paying tolls, this is $5051 per year.

In Liverpool, locals are forking out $11.70 per week which equates to 66 per cent more in tolls than inner metro households.

The top 10 percent of Liverpool households are paying up to $6098 per year in tolls.

Fairfield toll road users are paying $11.04 per week which is 57 per cent more in tolls than inner metro households.

For the top 10 per cent of households paying tolls, this is equal to $6046 per year.

Campbelltown MP and opposition spokesman for Western Sydney Greg Warren said the data did not come as a surprise.

"The data represents a fact we already knew - that Macarthur and the rest of western Sydney pay more in tolls than other Sydney residents," he said.

"Yet we have the least amount of new road infrastructure.

"We are still waiting for upgrades on Appin Road and there are copious roads in Camden and Wolllondilly that have been ignored; like the Spring Farm Parkway for example."

Mr Warren said the data had reinforced what he already knew as a Macarthur resident.

"It's not a surprise to me because I travel from Macarthur every day for work - be it on the road or the trains depending on where I need to be," he said.

"It angers me as a local but it also frustrates me as a local member because people are forking out money to the government without getting the infrastructure we deserve in return."