'We're not a hotspot': mayor

Thumbs up: Fairfield mayor Frank Carbone with the nurses and staff at the COVID-19 testing clinic at Fairfield Showground on Thursday. Picture: Facebook
Thumbs up: Fairfield mayor Frank Carbone with the nurses and staff at the COVID-19 testing clinic at Fairfield Showground on Thursday. Picture: Facebook

Fairfield mayor Frank Carbone has hit out at the "double standards" when it comes to classifying COVID-19 hotspots.

In July, Queensland declared Fairfield a COVID-19 hotspot as a result of the rising Thai Rock restaurant cluster in Wetherill Park.

That cluster has now gone,Thai Rock has reopened and yet Fairfield is still considered a "hotspot".

"While case numbers are developing on the eastern and northern suburbs of the Sydney CBD and other areas, I haven't seen the media classify these areas as no go zones or call them a hotspot like they did for Fairfield," the mayor posted on Facebook.

"However despite our city not having any new cases or clusters for quite a while now, it seems we are still considered a hotspot.

"If any one tells you that we are a hotspot, tell them to look at the facts and that we have had less cases than Queensland since the premier declared us a hotspot and no more cases that other areas not considered a hotspot.

"I think all of NSW has done a great job, but yet the media as labelled us and ran away and some people's ignorance persists...it just seems to me that there could be some double standard when it comes to reporting."

Mr Carbone said the city hasn't had any new cases in any area for more that seven days and in most areas for more than 14 days, which indicates "no clusters and obvious transmission."

"That's not to say cases cannot come up on the futures and we need to continue doing the right thing by social distancing and getting tested if symptoms persist across all areas," he said.

Mr Carbone visited the Fairfield Showground COVID-19 testing clinic on Thursday to thank the dedicated nurses and staff at the front line.

"Rain, hail or shine they have been there for our community over the past two months," he said.

"We are not over it yet, but as we look back at one of the most difficult time our community has faced, while others shed away from our city, they stayed on and worked with us and turned up every day, with more than 20,000 tests done.

"Even if you have very mild symptoms like a scratchy throat, cough, runny nose or slight fever, be sure to get tested.

"We can all do our part in helping to stop the spread by keeping our distance, wearing a mask where we cannot physically distance and practise good hand hygiene."