Cerebral Palsy Alliance offers telepractice service for patients to receive early intervention treatment

TELEPRACTICE: Orange mother Ineke Warner said additional funding to Cerebral Palsy Alliance has helped her daughter reach milestones. Photo: JUDE KEOGH
TELEPRACTICE: Orange mother Ineke Warner said additional funding to Cerebral Palsy Alliance has helped her daughter reach milestones. Photo: JUDE KEOGH

Without the help from staff at the Cerebral Palsy Alliance, 10-month-old Imogen Warner wouldn't have been able to roll and sit up.

NSW Central West Mother Ineke Warner said she was referred to the non-for-profit organisation through her paediatrician to help Imogen with early intervention therapies.

"We started face-to-face consultations in February, but during the COVID-19 lockdown we used their telepractice service to help Imogen get the care she needs," she said.

"Nothing can replace in person rapport and consultations but we have been able to continue the appointments at least twice a week in the comfort of my living room."

The CPA's Early Response Therapy Program received additional funding of $70,000 from the Greater Charitable Foundation to provide clients with a telepractice service to continue early intervention therapy.

"The telehealth service has helped my daughter immensely with her development and I believe this service should continue to give people in regional communities access to healthcare," Mrs Warner said.

"We would not have been able to have achieved the milestones of being able to roll and sit up without the intervention and it would have further delayed her reaching the milestones."

Mrs Warner also said she credits the staff for their patience and communication with Imogen through the CPA telepractice service.

"I would like to thank Emma who looks after the physiotherapy, Hannah who looks after occupational therapy and Jordan helps with speech for their flexibility and help during this time," she said.

"I feel like Imogen has not missed out on accessing healthcare during the coronavirus pandemic because they have been a great support."

The CPA doesn't just help babies but also children, teenagers and and adults with cerebral palsy, but also those who have autism, experienced stroke, Parkinson's Disease, MS and other neurological and physical disabilities.

"Knowing the organisation helps other people with needs means that it is pivotal to continue telehealth services to reach and support others," Mrs Warner added.

"It also eases the burden of any financial stress parents may feel to give their child access to healthcare."

CPA will also use the funding to purchase new assessment kits used remotely to assess an at-risk baby's cognitive skills, language, swallowing and feeding, social-emotional and adaptation development.

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This story Without telehealth access, Imogen wouldn't be able to roll, sit up first appeared on Central Western Daily.