Drinking, lifestyle under spotlight during Men's Health Week 2020

Lifestyle issue: Globally, alcohol is linked to six times more deaths in men than women.
Lifestyle issue: Globally, alcohol is linked to six times more deaths in men than women.

Australian men are more likely than women to die from a number of health conditions, and males are more than three times more likely to die from self-harm than females.

Factors that determine men's overall health and lifespan include alcohol consumption, sleep, mental wellness, activity and nutrition.

Globally, alcohol is linked to six times more deaths in men than women.

The disparity in men's and women's health is under the spotlight during Men's Health Week, June 15-21.

Delivered by Western Sydney University's Men's Health Information and Resource Centre, it aims to provoke thought and discussion about what needs to be done to improve male health.

According to the Men's Health Week website, more males die at every stage of life, are more likely to have accidents, take their own lives or suffer from lifestyle-related health conditions. They also less frequently visit general practitioners.

The Australian Bureau of Statistics' (ABS) Gender Indicators, Australia, September 2017, shows the life expectancy for a male born between 2013 and 2015 was about 80 years, compared with 85 years for a female.

Males are also more likely to die of heart, stroke and vascular disease, diabetes and some cancers, according to the figures.

The death rate from suicide is more than three times higher for males than females. In 2015, just under 2300 males died from intentional self-harm, compared with 735 females, ABS figures show.

According to an ABS graph showing the leading causes of death by gender, males account for 75.7 per cent of deaths caused by intentional self-harm.

This is followed by skin cancer, 67.4 per cent, cirrhosis and other liver diseases, 66.5 per cent, lung cancer, 58.9 per cent, and blood and lymph cancers, 57.4 per cent.

Men's Health Week puts the focus on the health impacts of men's and boys' environments, examines the factors that contribute to poorer male health, and what can be done to improve this.

Research has shown only 30 per cent of men's health is determined by genetics, while 70 per cent is lifestyle-based.

Details: Visit menshealthweek.org.au or click here.

This story Drinking, lifestyle under spotlight during Men's Health Week first appeared on St George & Sutherland Shire Leader.