FILM REVIEW: The Kitchen

What happens when you bring together two comedy stars, a small screen darling of drama and the writer of one of this decade's best biopics?

You get The Kitchen, a new crime drama set in New York in the late 1970s.

The film - which has been getting a critical panning that will not be reflected in this review - stars Melissa McCarthy (Spy), Tiffany Haddish (Girls Trip) and Elisabeth Moss (Us) as three mob wives who take matters into their own hands after their husbands are sent to jail.

Written and directed by Andrea Berloff (who was Oscar-nominated for her Straight Outta Compton script back in 2015), The Kitchen is based on a DC comic series of the same name.

The leading ladies are fed up with the disrespect they've been shown by members of the Irish mob - their 'family' - who run the New York district of Hell's Kitchen.

The remaining mobsters promised to 'look after' the families of their incarcerated colleagues, but are skimping out on their duties.

So Kathy (McCarthy), Ruby (Haddish) and Claire (Moss) decide they can be better mobsters than the men in charge, and begin to build their empire.

Sisters doing it for themselves: Elisabeth Moss, Melissa McCarthy and Tiffany Haddish star as Irish mobsters Claire, Kathy and Ruby in Andrea Berloff's The Kitchen.

Sisters doing it for themselves: Elisabeth Moss, Melissa McCarthy and Tiffany Haddish star as Irish mobsters Claire, Kathy and Ruby in Andrea Berloff's The Kitchen.

From a feminist perspective, it's empowering to see these women taking care of business, moving outside the culinary kitchen to take charge of their own destinies.

And they're good at the job - from providing protection to making offers that can't be refused, the women are every bit as capable as the men.

In this respect, there are many similarities that can be drawn between The Kitchen and last year's excellent Widows, however the new film has neither the weight nor topicality of the earlier Chicago-based heist drama.

While it's never going to be The Godfather or Goodfellas or any of those classic mobster films, The Kitchen is still enjoyable and showcases the allure and danger of power.

This is quite apart from the exceptional soundtrack (hello Fleetwood Mac and Kansas) and truly exemplary costuming, especially for Ruby.

The film also features Domhnall Gleeson, Margo Martindale, Bill Camp, James Badge Dale, Common, Brian d'Arcy James and Jeremy Bobb in supporting roles.

Rating: 7/10