Doug Moody remembered as a ‘pioneer’ of community television

Vale: Doug Moody in the control room at CTV1. He was one of the foundation members of CTV1 in Redfern in 1987,
Vale: Doug Moody in the control room at CTV1. He was one of the foundation members of CTV1 in Redfern in 1987,

Canley Vale resident Doug Moody, one of the foundation members of CTV1 in Redfern, is being remembered as a “pioneer of community television” after he died from an unexpected heart attack on November 8.

Doug worked on Australia’s first community cable television station out of the basement of the high rise McKell Building until it closed in 2003.

He produced, directed and presented thousands of episodes of popular programs such as The Malu Botva Express and The Sunday Joyride.

In recent years, he ran a community television studio from his home and uploaded the completed programs onto YouTube.

Doug was also a busy novelist (who self-published more than fifty books) and a playwright. His most successful work was Second Hand Dreams, a play which he wrote especially for Colleen Clifford, the late grande dame of Australian theatre, who appeared in a production of the show in 1995.  

Doug Moody  at the CTV1 25th anniversary reunion in 2012 with Darren Gray (left), Clover Moore and the late Joy Hruby.

Doug Moody at the CTV1 25th anniversary reunion in 2012 with Darren Gray (left), Clover Moore and the late Joy Hruby.

Moody’s agent Darren Gray said Doug’s unexpected passing has come as a “great shock”.  “Doug was a true pioneer in the field of community television and did a great deal to help the underprivileged youngsters of the Redfern area,” he said.

“Through his productions he gave a voice to those who were ignored by the mainstream media and he trained up countless people in the skills to work either in front of or behind the camera.

“He was an extremely generous man who gave his time freely to help others. His unexpected passing has come as a great shock... he will be greatly missed.”