The amazing nurses take centrestage

In the spirit: Braeside Hospital celebrated International Nurses Day in an Amazing Race-style competition around the hospital grounds on Friday. Pictures: Simon Bennett
In the spirit: Braeside Hospital celebrated International Nurses Day in an Amazing Race-style competition around the hospital grounds on Friday. Pictures: Simon Bennett

They worked hard. They smiled. They had fun.

It was just another day at the office for the nurses at Braeside Hospital on Friday.

Only this time the day was about them.

To celebrates International Nurses Day, the nurses at the HammondCare facility competed in an Amazing Race-style event where they had to decipher clues and navigate their way through the hospital.

International Nurses Day is recognised every year on May 12, the birthday of the founder of modern nursing, Florence Nightingale.

International Nurses Day is recognised every year on May 12, the birthday of the founder of modern nursing, Florence Nightingale.

It was an fitting competition considering the daily challenges the nurses face.

Endorsed enrolled nurse Sunny Sok said every patient is different so every day on the job brings “different challenges”. 

He remembers one lady from Fairfield’s Cambodian community who spoke limited English.

“We both spoke Khmer, and so I was able to help calm and settle her,” he said.

Nurse Sunny Sok finds the next clue. The winning team was Blue Wren (palliative care) with Japet Bryan Toledo, Maree Earl, Brett Consolacion and Salina Scerri.

Nurse Sunny Sok finds the next clue. The winning team was Blue Wren (palliative care) with Japet Bryan Toledo, Maree Earl, Brett Consolacion and Salina Scerri.

“She got better and went back home, and since then I’ve seen her around in the Cambodian community. She even introduced me to her family. It was great to see her doing well and know she was being looked after.”

Clinical nurse consultant Teresia Matsveru, who works in palliative care, said it takes a special kind of person with special skills to be a nurse.

She recalls one story of caring for an older lady who did not have any close family.

“On her last day, she wanted someone just to sit with her and hold her hand. She didn’t want to talk, she just wanted the presence of another person. I don’t know how long I sat with her, but I stayed by her side until she died as it was important to her,” Mrs Matsveru said.

“I think nursing is such a satisfying and rewarding profession.”