ANZAC DAY | Peace comes to Liverpool

TO THE FRONT: AIF troops depart Liverpool station in 1916. Liverpool played a significant role in the war effort and this will be honoured with a public project at the museum in October. Picture supplied: Moorebank Heritage Group.
TO THE FRONT: AIF troops depart Liverpool station in 1916. Liverpool played a significant role in the war effort and this will be honoured with a public project at the museum in October. Picture supplied: Moorebank Heritage Group.

“Peace comes to Liverpool” is the title of a project this year to commemorate the significant local input by our region to WWI. This year marks the centenary of the signing of the Armistice that ended “the war to end all wars”.

The project is hosted by Moorebank Heritage Group in partnership with Liverpool Regional Museum and Liverpool Council.

There have been many commemorations these last three years focused on the great sacrifices by Australian servicemen and nurses at Gallipoli, the Western Front and the Middle East.

These recognised the massive loss of over 60,000 Diggers and nurses who served overseas.

The heritage group’s projects manager, Pam Browne, said the war efforts on the home front, military and civilian, have been under-played during the centenary celebrations embracing 1914 to 1918.

She said; “Liverpool played a significant role in preparing Australian troops of the 1st Australian Imperial Force. The Liverpool Field Training Area was the second training area acquired by the Commonwealth, the first in NSW, and it evolved as the largest training facility in Australia during WWI until the inter-war period. About 120,000 recruits and 45,000 horses were trained at Liverpool before leaving on overseas service.”

The group wants to highlight the significant role Liverpool played in preparing the troops and the district’s war effort in general and how this period gave Liverpool international prominence. The exhibition will highlight the forces that led to the Armistice, how the Liverpool community chose to celebrate it and the quest for enduring peace.

“Unfortunately, today there’s only a handful of original elements left from WWI that can be related to the LFTA; two are Kitchener House (Arpafeelie) and remnants of the Liverpool-Holdsworthy (sic) military railway.

“It’s not widely known that over 60 men died at the Liverpool Camp from illness or accident. Their deaths collectively have still not been officially recognised.”

Peace Comes to Liverpool will have lead-up events in May and July and will be opened and a book on WWI Liverpool Army Camp launched at the museum on October 6.

It’ll be open to the public from October 6 to December 1.

The group is eager to borrow photos, letters and newspaper clippings about Liverpool’s military role, including the original German trophy gun and trench mortar allotted here in 1920.

  • Archival loans, further details: Pam Browne, 0408 579 781 psbrowne@hotmail.com or Mike Davis, 0417 651 922, info@mikedavis.com.au.
This story Peace comes to Liverpool first appeared on Liverpool City Champion.

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