Push for high-density housing across Fairfield

New dwellings: Fairfield councillor Lawrence White speaking with Fairfield mayor Frank Carbone about the rezoning of land across the Fairfield local government area. Picture: Simon Bennett

New dwellings: Fairfield councillor Lawrence White speaking with Fairfield mayor Frank Carbone about the rezoning of land across the Fairfield local government area. Picture: Simon Bennett

TRANSPORT and commercial corridors in the Fairfield local government area will be rezoned to high density residential to make way for new houses required by the state government.

The draft Sydney Metropolitan Strategy, released by the Department of Planning and Environment last year, identified Fairfield to be part of the south west growth area which requires 141,000 houses be built by 2031.

The draft West Central Sub Regional Strategy set dwelling targets for councils and required Fairfield to provide 24,000 new ones by 2031.

Out of this target, 80 per cent were to be provided in locations within 30 minutes — by public transport — of the strategic centres of Fairfield and Prairiewood.

In May 2008, a council committee agreed to prepare the Fairfield Residential Development Strategy East plan in two stages, with stage one focused on the eastern side of the city including Fairfield, Cabramatta, Canley Vale, Canley Heights, Fairfield Heights and Villawood.

Consultation with the public was completed in 2008, with the community supporting the rezoning of five different areas to high density.

These include land in the Fairfield and Fairfield Heights corridor between Polding and Churchill streets, the Fairfield and Canley Vale corridor located north of Coleraine Street, and land within Fairfield East north of Villawood Station.

Land situated north and south of Villawood Station will also be considered for R4 high density.

Councillor Lawrence White said he would be happy to get residents to complete a survey about the proposed sites.

"Fairfield and Villawood have families that have been living there for a long long time," he said. "Their roots are here and they probably want to spend the rest of their lives in Fairfield, so it's going to be very important as to how we will respond to the residents' concerns.

"I hope the council will listen to the response of residents."

Fairfield mayor Frank Carbone said the council would speak to residents about the sites.

"It's in the transport hubs and we're sending the residents, and adjoining residents, a survey," he said. "We will also have further consultations with them, showing the state government how it's done."

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