History must be remembered, says Mt Pritchard teacher and University student

Important lessons: Robyn and Samantha Mancuso say indigenous studies should be taught through Australian primary schools.

Important lessons: Robyn and Samantha Mancuso say indigenous studies should be taught through Australian primary schools.

MT Pritchard's Samantha Mancuso knows the importance of incorporating indigenous studies in primary schools across the country.

The 19-year-old is at the University of Western Sydney's Bankstown campus, studying a Bachelor of Education (Primary — Aboriginal Rural Education Program), which is only available to Australian indigenous students.

"It's very important to incorporate indigenous studies into the school curriculum because every year teachers are teaching less of it and the culture and traditions will be gone soon," she said.

"So it's vital we teach the younger generation about our history before it gets forgotten."

Leading by example, her mother, Robyn, a teacher at Heckenberg Public School, also said it was pivotal to teach youngsters about their culture.

"In past years, there hasn't been much Aboriginal studies incorporated in the school curriculum," she said.

"But it's now being taught in the subject of history in primary schools so it's slowly coming out in the syllabus."

Mrs Mancuso said not only was it important for all children to take part in indigenous studies, but it was particularly important for those who were Aboriginal.

"I went through my whole life knowing I was Aboriginal but it wasn't as big then as it is now," she said.

Samantha said after she completed her degree and became a qualified teacher, she wanted to dedicate one part of her class to learning about the indigenous culture.

Smartphone
Tablet - Narrow
Tablet - Wide
Desktop