Barber delights in resurgence of trade

Hair master: Bacini Hair's resident barber Daniel Varzquez says the barber's pole carries its stripes for a reason. Picture: Jeff de Pasquale

Hair master: Bacini Hair's resident barber Daniel Varzquez says the barber's pole carries its stripes for a reason. Picture: Jeff de Pasquale

EVER wondered what was the significance of the pole located outside of many traditional barber shops?

There's a fair chance you may be sorry you asked.

The red, white and blue helix inside the barber pole represents blood, veins and a white towel.

Barber Daniel Varzquez, who works at Bacini Hair in Club Marconi, said the barber's pole was once used as the laundry pole in the days when barbers performed minor surgery.

"It used to sit in the middle of the shop and after shaving and bloodletting, customers used to use white towels to swipe their faces," Mr Varquez said.

"With the bloodletting, there were also some smaller veins seen on the towels.

"The towels were then thrown on the pole."

A barber in Fairfield for 30 years, Mr Varzquez was born into the trade.

As a young child, he was the only male in the family and helped out with the family business before and after school.

"I have enjoyed it ever since," he said.

"I love making people feel better about their appearances even if it's just a tidy-up or a face shave."

Mr Varzquez said men, young and old, still attended even if it was just for a shave.

"Barbering has come back big time," he said.

"It's growing and now we're seeing the younger generation come back.

"It's also place where people can come in, have a chat and socialise."

Having seen all the hair trends take place over the years, Mr Varzquez said the modern side part from the early 1950s was back in fashion.

"The bushranger beards are also a hit now. It's a new modern hipster look that's come back into fashion."

Smartphone
Tablet - Narrow
Tablet - Wide
Desktop